Is it going to rain today? - Wiki Topia
is it going to rain today?

Rain is water falling from clouds. Rainfall is the total amount of water that falls in a given time period. While most rain falls within the tropics, some also falls in temperate areas, mostly as snow or sleet.

Rain is liquid water in the form of droplets that have condensed from atmospheric water vapor and then becomes heavy enough to fall under gravity.

Rain is liquid water in the form of droplets that have condensed from atmospheric water vapor and then becomes heavy enough for gravity to pull them down. It’s a common misconception that raindrops are formed because of the collision between gas molecules and dust particles. But scientists have proven this theory wrong by measuring the size of droplets and their velocity when they fall on Earth, which showed that they are too large to be formed through collisions with gases like nitrogen or oxygen.

There are three types of precipitation: rain, sleet (falling snow), and snow (falling ice crystal). Rain occurs when warm air cant hold as much moisture as it did before it rose; this causes some water to condense out as tiny liquid droplets. These droplets fall back down into cold air where they freeze or become sleet or snow depending on how cold it is at ground level. The warmer it gets during summer months then more water evaporates off land surfaces into clouds which produce heavier rainfall events than those seen during winter months due to low relative humidity levels over land areas.”

Rain is a major component of the water cycle and is responsible for depositing most of the fresh water on the Earth.

Rain is a major component of the water cycle, and its responsible for depositing most of the fresh water on Earth. It also happens to be responsible for depositing most of the fresh water on Earth.

It produces precipitation, a major component of the hydrologic cycle.

For those who are unfamiliar with the term, “hydrologic cycle” refers to the continuous process of water in its various forms on Earth. Rainfall is a major component of this cycle and one of the most important forms of precipitation. Rainfall is a major source of fresh water for all living things—and its also responsible for producing two-thirds of our fresh water supply!

Approximately 505,000 km3 (121,000 cu mi) of water falls as precipitation annually; 398,000 km3 (95,000 cu mi) of it over the oceans and 107,000 km3 (26,000 cu mi) over land.

You should know that the average precipitation per year is about 50 mm per year. The average precipitation per year over land is about 100 mm per year. The average precipitation per year over the oceans is about 400 mm per year.

Given the Earths surface area, that means the globally averaged annual precipitation is 990 millimetres (39 in).

The average global rainfall is about 50 mm per year, which is estimated to be just over 2 inches. However this varies from as little as 100 mm per year in deserts to more than 10,000 mm per year in some tropical rainforests. It is estimated that there are about 5 million rain gauges around the world so we can make an accurate estimation of how much it will rain each day.

Climate classification systems such as the Köppen classification system use average annual rainfall to help differentiate between differing climate regimes.

The most commonly used climate classification systems are the Köppen climate classification system and the Trewartha climate classification system. The Köppen system uses average annual rainfall to help differentiate between differing climate regimes, whereas the Trewartha system uses months of rainfall distribution (the total amount of precipitation in a year divided by 12) instead.

Rainfall is measured using rain gauges.

Rainfall is measured using rain gauges. Rain gauges are used to measure rainfall amounts that are representative of the area being measured. They can be mounted on a pole or wall and used over a short period or over a long period.

Rainfall amounts can be estimated by weather radar.

Even though its not raining now, you can still estimate the amount of rainfall that has or will fall. Heres how:

  • Go to your local weather radar website and see if theres precipitation on the map. If you cant see any rain, hail or snow on the radar, then theres no precipitation—and therefore no rainfall either!
  • If there is a little bit of precipitation present in some areas and not others, look at how much time passed between when you first saw those areas with precipitation and when it stopped showing up again (or didnt show up again). The more time there was between seeing those areas affected by precipitation and then stopping seeing them affected by precipitation again (or not), the wetter things got during that period.

The average global rain rate is about 50 mm per year, but it varies from as little as 100 mm per year in deserts to more than 10,000 mm per year in some tropical rainforests

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Conclusion

The average global rain rate is about 50 mm per year, but it varies from as little as 100 mm per year in deserts to more than 10,000 mm per year in some tropical rainforests.

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